Mestizos A Push Chapter 16 Homework

Fall 2009

African-American and African Studies Program

AAS 1010 - Introduction to African-American and African Studies (4)

Instructor: Roquinaldo Ferreira

12:30-1:45PM Tu/Th, Minor Hall 125

This introductory course surveys the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean from approximately the Middle Ages to the 1880s. Emphases include the Atlantic slave trade and its complex relationship to Africa; the economic systems, cultures, and communities of Africans and African-Americans in the New World, in slavery and in freedom; the rise of anti-slavery movements; and the socio-economic systems that replaced slavery in the late 19th century.

Required Discussion Section

AAS 2700 - Festivals of the Americas (3)

Instructor: Jalane Schmidt

9:30-10:45AM Tu/Th, McLeod Hall 1004

By reading case studies of various religious festivals in locations throughout the Caribbean and South, Central and North America, as well as theoretical literature drawn from social anthropology and religious studies, students will become familiar with significant features of contemporary religious life in the Americas, as well as with scholarly accounts of religious and cultural change. Students will become more critical readers of ethnographic and historical sources, as well as theories from the Study of Religion (Jonathan Z. Smith, Ronald Grimes, Lawrence Sullivan), and will increase their ability to theorize about ritual, festivity, sacred time, ritual space and ethnicity

Required DiscussionSection

Cross-listed as RELG 2700

AAS 3157 - Caribbean Perspectives (3)

Instructor: Yarimar Bonilla

3:30-6:00PM W, Monroe Hall 116

Breaking with popular constructions of the region as a timeless tropical paradise, this course will re-define the Caribbean as the birthplace of modern forms of capitalism, globalization, and trans-nationalism. We will survey the founding moments of Caribbean history, including the imposition of slavery, the rise of plantation economies, and the development of global networks of goods and peoples. We will then examine the various forms of colonial and imperial power that have operated in the region during the latter part of the twentieth century and the lasting legacies of inequality and hierarchy that persist in contemporary Caribbean societies. Lastly, we will revisit the idea of the Caribbean as a tourist heaven and question popular images of the region as a site of tropical fantasy.

Cross-listed as ANTH 3157

AAS 3200 - Martin, Malcolm, and America (3)

Instructor: Mark Hadley

12:00-12:50PM M/W/F, New Cabell Hall 215

An intensive examination of African-American social criticism centered upon, but not limited to, the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. We will come to grips with the American legacy of racial hatred and oppression systematized in the institutions of antebellum chattel slavery and post-bellum racial segregation and analyze the array of critical responses to, and social struggles against, this legacy. We will pay particular attention to the religious dimensions of these various types of social criticism.

Cross-listed as RELG 3200

AAS 3500 - Kinfolks, Families, and Relating in the African Diaspora

Instructor: Todne Thomas

2:00-3:15PM Tu/Th, New Cabell Hall 234

This class is designed to trace the changing contours of New World African family affiliations across time and space. In doing so, we will undertake some of the difficult questions surrounding Black family lives and histories. How are the self-definition and social production of Black family ties impacted by economic and political forces as well as academic depictions of Black family realities? What oral, scientific, and religious technologies are used by the members of the Black Atlantic to (re)produce family genealogies? What are the impacts of unearthing “roots” and diasporic connections on African American, Afro-Caribbean, and Afro-Latino identity formation? Course materials include ethnographies and personal narratives representing various dimensions of Black family experiences. Documentaries and other visual media will also be assigned and used for course instruction.

AAS 3500 - Race, Law, and War

Instructor: Herbert "Tim" Lovelace

3:30-4:45PM Tu/Th, New Cabell Hall 324

AAS 4070 - Directed Reading and Research (3)

Similar in format to AAS 401, but meant to be equivalent to twice as much work (6 credits), and taken over a full year. Students in the DMP enroll under these numbers for thesis writing.

AAS 4500 - Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism: Race, Space and Culture (3)

Instructor: Marlon Ross, Ian Grandison

7:00-9:30PM Tu, Bryan Hall 332

Co-taught by K. Ian Grandison and Marlon Ross, this interdisciplinary seminar examines the spatial implications at work in the theories, practices, and experiences of race, as well as the cultural implications at stake in our apprehensions and conceptions of space. Themes include: 1) the human/nature threshold; 2) public domains/private lives; 3) urban renewal, historic preservation, and the new urbanism; 4) defensible design and the spatial politics of fear; and 5) the cultural ideologies of sustainability. The seminar foregrounds the multidimensionality of space as a physical, perceptual, social, ideological, and discursive phenomenon. This means melding concepts and practices used in the design professions with theories affiliated with race, postcolonial, literary, and cultural studies. We’ll investigate a variety of spaces, actual and discursive, through selected theoretical readings from diverse disciplines (e.g., William Cronon, Patricia Williams, Philip Deloria, Leslie Kanes Weisman, Gloria Anzaldua, Oscar Newman); through case studies (e.g., National Geographic documentary, Indian reservations, burial grounds, suburban homes, gay bars, national monuments); and through local site visits (Monticello, Vinegar Hill). Requirements include a midterm and final exam, one site visit response paper, and a major team research project and presentation.

Cross-listed as ENCR 4500

AAS 4500 - Fictions of Black Identity (3)

Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

11:00-12:15PM Tu/Th, Bryan Hall 332

This advanced undergraduate seminar will explore the dual meaning of its title “Fictions of Black Identity.” The first implication suggests the literary inventions (novels, essays, critical works) that address the meanings of blackness in an American context. The second meaning is heavily invested in the first: that Black identity is a fiction, not necessarily in the sense of falsity, but in its highly mediated, flexible, and variable condition. Questions to consider include: how does one make and measure Black identity? Can one be phenotypically White and still be Black? What is the value of racial masquerade? What does it mean to be legitimately Black? Readings include, but are not limited to, Percival Everett’s Erasure, Rebecca Walker’s Black, White, and Jewish, Paul Beatty’s White Boy Shuffle, and a range of critical essays. Mandatory assignments include critical essays, leading class discussion, midterm and final exams. This class is restricted to online waitlist and/or instructor permission. It is designed for students majoring in English, African American Studies, and/or American Studies.

Cross-listed as ENAM 4500

AAS 4570 - Advanced Research Seminar in African-American and African Studies: Ethnicity and Gender in Africa

Instructor: John Willis

3:30-6:00 Tu, New Cabell Hall 118

Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminatiing in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.

AAS 4993 - Independent Study (1-3)

Allows students to work on an individual research project. Students must propose a topic to an appropriate faculty member, submit a written proposal for approval, prepare an extensive annotated bibliography on relevant readings comparable to the reading list of a regular upper-level course, and complete a research paper of at least 20 pages.

AAS 5528 - Topics in Race Theory: Race in the 2008 Election(3)

Instructor: Wende Marshall

6:30-9:00PM M, Brooks Hall 103A

This course examines theories and practices of race and otherness, in order to analyze and interpret constructions, deconstructions and reconstructions of race from the late 18th to the 21st centuries. The focus varies from year to year, and may include race, progress and the Westgender, race and power,and whitesupremacy.'The consistent theme is that race is neither a biological nor a cultural category, but a method and theory of social organization, an alibi for inequality, and a strategy for resistance. Cross listed as AAS 528. Prerequisite: ANTH 101, 301, or other introductory or middle-level social science or humanities course

Cross-listed as ANTH 5528

AAS 5891 - South Atlantic History (3)

Instructor: Roquinaldo Ferreira

3:30-6:00PM Th, New Cabell Hall 122

Surveys the history of African and Africa-descendent peoples throughout the Atlantic by combining lectures, discussion sections and movies. It moves away from the prevailing North America-centric paradigm in studies of the African Diaspora to explore the forced migration of Africans in regions such as Angola, Brazil, Gold Coast, Kongo, Caribbean, and Cuba. The first section lays out the groundwork to understand the development of the African Diaspora by focusing on Africa before and after its interactions with Europeans. The second section centers on Latin America and the Caribbean, where almost eighty percent of Africans forced to leave Africa wound up as slaves. The last section deals with North America, tracing the process of establishment of enslaved labor force in the seventeenth century and exploring nineteenth and twentieth centuries Diasporic connections between the United States, Haiti, and Liberia. The class devotes significant attention to issues such as community formation in Africa, religion in Africa and the Diaspora, slavery, the transatlantic slave trade, back-to-Africa movement by Afro-Brazilians and African-Americans, origins of pan-Africanist movement, and resistance to slave labor in Africa and in the Americas.

Cross-listed as HIST 5891

American Studies Program

Department of Anthropology

ANTH 2156 - Peoples and Cultures of Africa

Instructor: Jason Hickel

10:00-10:50AM, M/W/F, Rouss Hall 410

ANTH 3157 - Caribbean Perspectives (3)

Instructor: Yarimar Bonilla

3:30-6:00PM W, Monroe Hall 116

Breaking with popular constructions of the region as a timeless tropical paradise, this course will re-define the Caribbean as the birthplace of modern forms of capitalism, globalization, and trans-nationalism. We will survey the founding moments of Caribbean history, including the imposition of slavery, the rise of plantation economies, and the development of global networks of goods and peoples. We will then examine the various forms of colonial and imperial power that have operated in the region during the latter part of the twentieth century and the lasting legacies of inequality and hierarchy that persist in contemporary Caribbean societies. Lastly, we will revisit the idea of the Caribbean as a tourist heaven and question popular images of the region as a site of tropical fantasy.

Cross-listed as AAS 3157

ANTH 3880 - African Archeology (3)

Instructor: Adria LaViolette

11:00-11:50AM M/W/F, New Cabell Hall 138

This course surveys the archaeological knowledge currently available about the African continent, with particular emphasis on the Late Stone Age, when fully modern humans dominate the cultural landscape, and periods thereafter through the archaeology of the colonial period. The material includes the great social, economic, and cultural transformations in African history known primarily through archaeology, and the most important archaeological sites and discoveries on the continent. Throughout the course a theme will be the politics of the past, and the changing role of the practice of archaeology in Africa.

ANTH 5528 - Topics in Race Theory: Race in the 2008 Election (3)

Instructor: Wende Marshall

6:30-9:00PM M, Brooks Hall 103A

This course examines theories and practices of race and otherness, in order to analyze and interpret constructions, deconstructions and reconstructions of race from the late 18th to the 21st centuries. The focus varies from year to year, and may include race, progress and the Westgender, race and power,and whitesupremacy.'The consistent theme is that race is neither a biological nor a cultural category, but a method and theory of social organization, an alibi for inequality, and a strategy for resistance. Cross listed as AAS 528. Prerequisite: ANTH 101, 301, or other introductory or middle-level social science or humanities course.

Cross-listed as AAS 5528

Department of Art History

Department of Drama

DRAM 3070 - African American Theatre (3)

Instructor: Theresa Davis

2:00-3:15PM Tu/Th, Drama Ed. Bldg. 217

Presents a comprehensive study of “Black Theatre” as the African-American contribution to the theatre. Explores the historical, cultural, and socio-political underpinnings of this this theatre as an artistic form in American and world culture. Students gain a broader understanding of the relationship and contributions of this theatre to theatre arts, business, education, lore, and humanity. A practical theatrical experience is a part of the course offering.

Department of English

ENAM 3130 - African-American Survey I (3)

Instructor: Deborah McDowell

2:00-3:15PM Tu/Th, Maury Hall 110

This course surveys pivotal moments and texts in the history of African-American letters, from Briton Hammon's Narrative of Uncommon Sufferings (1860) to W. E. B. DuBois's The Souls of Black Folk (1903)Charles Chesnutt's The Marrow of Tradition (1901). Working our way through a variety of genres (elegy, drama, the captivity narrative, the slave narrative, the essay, public oratory, speeches, and novels), we will explore a number of matters pertinent to literary studies in general, as well as those with specific implications for African-American writing and writers. We will consider the circumstances of textual production and reception, ideas and ideologies of literary history and culture, aesthetics, authorship and audience. We will focus our attention immediately on the emergence of African-American writing under the regime of slavery and the questions it poses about "race," "authorship," "subjectivity," "self-mastery," and "freedom." We will consider the material and social conditions under which our selected texts were edited, published, marketed, and "authenticated," lingering especially on the role white abolitionists and editors played in the production and mediation of these texts for various reading publics. Our ultimate aim is to situate our selections within the broadest possible contexts of their time and ours. Other required texts include Phillis Wheatley's Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, Frederick Douglass's Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Frances Harper's Iola Leroy, William Wells Brown's Clotelle, Harriet Wilson's Our Nig and Charles Chesnutt's The Marrow of Tradition.

ENAM 3510 - Reading the Black College Campus

Instructor: Ian Grandison

12:30-1:45PM Tu/Th, Cabell 132

ENAM 3559 - Cross-Cultures of Modern Harlem

Instructor: Sandhya Shukla

9:30-10:45 Tu/Th, New Cabell Hall 338

This course explores the cultural production, intellectual history and political movements that construct the globality of Harlem. Beginning at the turn of the twentieth century, we cover the development of various ethnic and racial neighborhoods arrayed across regions of the area—Black Harlem, Jewish Harlem, Italian Harlem and Spanish Harlem—and the conflicts and intimacies inherent in their transformations over time. We inquire into the representation and life of Harlem through the lens of the navigation and contestation of difference. Considering migrancy, diaspora, nationalism, race and ethnicity, and class formation in comparative perspective brings the global into the local and effectively reimagines how “minoritized space” is made both materially and symbolically. Materials to be discussed include works by Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, James Weldon Johnson, Piri Thomas, Yuri Kochiyama, Leroi Jones, Irving Horowitz, Gordon Parks Jr., Joe Cuba, Jacob Lawrence, and others.

ENAM 4500 - Fictions of Black Identity (3)

Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

11:00-12:15PM Tu/Th, Bryan Hall 332

This advanced undergraduate seminar will explore the dual meaning of its title “Fictions of Black Identity.” The first implication suggests the literary inventions (novels, essays, critical works) that address the meanings of blackness in an American context. The second meaning is heavily invested in the first: that Black identity is a fiction, not necessarily in the sense of falsity, but in its highly mediated, flexible, and variable condition. Questions to consider include: how does one make and measure Black identity? Can one be phenotypically White and still be Black? What is the value of racial masquerade? What does it mean to be legitimately Black? Readings include, but are not limited to, Percival Everett’s Erasure, Rebecca Walker’s Black, White, and Jewish, Paul Beatty’s White Boy Shuffle, and a range of critical essays. Mandatory assignments include critical essays, leading class discussion, midterm and final exams. This class is restricted to online waitlist and/or instructor permission. It is designed for students majoring in English, African American Studies, and/or American Studies.

Cross-listed as AAS 4500

ENAM 4814 - African-American Women Writers (3)

Instructor: Angela Davis

9:30-10:45AM Tu/Th, Pavilion VIII 103

We will read several novels and short stories by African American women, examining in particular how the authors portray black women as individuals and in the context of American society. This course requires active class participation, two written responses to readings (each 2 to 3 double spaced typed pages long) and a formal essay (12 to 15 pages long). The reading list is: Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ntozake Shange, For Colored Girls; Toni Morrison, Sula, and Tar Baby; Alice Walker, In Love and Trouble; Paule Marshall, Brown Girl, Brownstones; Gloria Naylor, The Women of Brewster Place.

Prerequisite: The course is first offered to fourth year majors in English, Women's Studies and Afro-American and African Studies.

ENCR 4500 - Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism: Race, Space and Culture (3)

Instructor: Marlon Ross, Ian Grandison

7:00-9:30PM Tu, Bryan Hall 332

Co-taught by K. Ian Grandison and Marlon Ross, this interdisciplinary seminar examines the spatial implications at work in the theories, practices, and experiences of race, as well as the cultural implications at stake in our apprehensions and conceptions of space. Themes include: 1) the human/nature threshold; 2) public domains/private lives; 3) urban renewal, historic preservation, and the new urbanism; 4) defensible design and the spatial politics of fear; and 5) the cultural ideologies of sustainability. The seminar foregrounds the multidimensionality of space as a physical, perceptual, social, ideological, and discursive phenomenon. This means melding concepts and practices used in the design professions with theories affiliated with race, postcolonial, literary, and cultural studies. We’ll investigate a variety of spaces, actual and discursive, through selected theoretical readings from diverse disciplines (e.g., William Cronon, Patricia Williams, Philip Deloria, Leslie Kanes Weisman, Gloria Anzaldua, Oscar Newman); through case studies (e.g., National Geographic documentary, Indian reservations, burial grounds, suburban homes, gay bars, national monuments); and through local site visits (Monticello, Vinegar Hill). Requirements include a midterm and final exam, one site visit response paper, and a major team research project and presentation.

Cross-listed as AAS 4500

ENLT 2547 - Black Writers in America, section 0002: Black Women Writers (3)

Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

9:30-10:45AM Tu/Th, Cabell Hall B029

This seminar uses Black women’s writings from mid-century to the present to introduce new English majors to important concepts in literary analysis. To better understand genre, themes, and assorted literary conventions, we will focus closely on a range of literary styles. We will also consider patterns of representation established in the 1950s and watch how they develop, disintegrate, or evolve into the present day. Do certain issues or themes remain important in Black women’s writing of the last fifty years? How has the literature adapted in response to specific cultural or historical moments.

Restricted to 1st and 2nd Year Students

ENLT 2547 - Black Writers in America, section 0003: Black Women Writers (3)

Instructor: Camilla Amirati

2:00-3:15PM M/W, Cabell Hall 424

Restricted to 1st and 2nd Year Students

ENMC 4500 - African-American Drama

Instructor: Lotta Lofgren

9:30-10:45AM T/Th, Bryan 330

A survey of African-American drama from the 1950's to the present. Along the way, we will place the drama in relation to established norms, investigating the motives and methods of the playwrights for carving out new ground. We will examine the shared and divergent concerns of male and female playwrights, their sense of audience, the dilema of writing as an idividual and as a member of a group silenced too long, their relationship to the past, the present, and the future. We will also examine the changing definitions of the black aesthetic. We will read works by James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Adrienne Kennedy, Amiri Baraka, Ntozake Shange, Augsut Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, and others.

Department of French Language & Literature

FREN 4743 - Africa in Cinema (3)

Instructor: Kandioura Drame

11:00-12:15PM Tu/Th, New Cabell Hall 242

Study of the representation of Africa in American, Western European and African films. Ideological Constructions of the African as 'other'. Exoticism in cinema. History of African cinema. Economic issues in African cinema: production, distribution, and the role of African film festivals. The socio-political context. Women in African cinema. Aesthetic problems: themes and narrative styles.

Prerequisite: French 332 and French 344 or another 300-level course in French

Department of History

HIAF 2001 - Early African History (4)

Instructor: Joseph Miller

9:30-10:45AM Tu/Th, Claude Moore Nursing Edu. G120

Studies the history of African civilizations from the iron age through the era of the slave trade, ca. 1800. Emphasizes the search for the themes of social, political, economic, and intellectual history which present African civilizations on their own terms.

Required Discussion Section

HIAF 3021 - History of Southern Africa (4)

Instructor: John Mason

12:30-1:45PM Tu/Th, Claude Moore Nursing Edu. G120

Studies the history of Africa generally south of the Zambezi River. Emphasizes African institutions, creation of ethnic and racial identities, industrialization, and rural poverty, from the early formation of historical communities to recent times.

HIAF 4511 - Colloquium in African History: Race & Culture in S. Africa & the US (4)

Instructor: John Mason

3:30-4:45PM Tu/Th, New Cabell Hall 319

The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.

HIAF 4993 - Independent Study in African History (1-3)

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member, any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors

HILA 3111 - Public Life in Modern Latin America (3)

Instructor: Herbert Braun

8:00-9:15AM Tu/Th, New Cabell Hall 430

How do Latin Americans navigate their ways, collectively and also individually, through their hierarchical social orders? Why is there so often so much stability and order to their societies? Surveys inform us that Latin Americans are among the happiest people in the world? Why might this be? Why do so many Latin Americans across time appear to be so proud of their nations? Why do they look at one another so often? Why is there so little hatred in Latin America? Why do poor people in Latin America seem to know more about rich people than rich people know about them? Why do traditions matter so? Why are there so many good novelists there? These and other questions, answerable and not, about life and the human condition in Latin America are what will be about in this course.

HIST 5891 - South Atlantic History (3)

Instructor: Roquinaldo Ferreira

3:30-6:00PM Th, New Cabell Hall 122

Surveys the history of African and Africa-descendent peoples throughout the Atlantic by combining lectures, discussion sections and movies. It moves away from the prevailing North America-centric paradigm in studies of the African Diaspora to explore the forced migration of Africans in regions such as Angola, Brazil, Gold Coast, Kongo, Caribbean, and Cuba. The first section lays out the groundwork to understand the development of the African Diaspora by focusing on Africa before and after its interactions with Europeans. The second section centers on Latin America and the Caribbean, where almost eighty percent of Africans forced to leave Africa wound up as slaves. The last section deals with North America, tracing the process of establishment of enslaved labor force in the seventeenth century and exploring nineteenth and twentieth centuries Diasporic connections between the United States, Haiti, and Liberia. The class devotes significant attention to issues such as community formation in Africa, religion in Africa and the Diaspora, slavery, the transatlantic slave trade, back-to-Africa movement by Afro-Brazilians and African-Americans, origins of pan-Africanist movement, and resistance to slave labor in Africa and in the Americas.

Cross-listed as AAS 5891

HIUS 3651 - Afro-American History to 1865 (3)

Instructor: Claudrena Harold

2:00-2:50PM M/W, Claude Moore Nursing Edu. G120

This course surveys the major political, cultural, social, and intellectual developments taking place in African American history from the beginning of the Atlantic Slave Trade to the end of the American Civil War. Specific attention will be given to the formation and evolution of slave communities in the American South, the complex ways whites and blacks grappled with the “slavery question”, and the northern roots of Jim Crow America. Through an analysis of slave narratives and political tracts, students will also become familiar with various thinkers in the African American intellectual tradition.

Required Discussion Section

HIUS 3671 - History of the Civil Rights Movement (3)

Instructor: Julian Bond

3:30-5:30PM Tu, Wilson Hall 301

This lecture course examines the history, philosophies, tactics, events and personalities of the Southern movement for civil rights from 1900 through the late 1960s, with special concentration on the years from the mid-'40s forward.

The Southern movement - variously called the black struggle, the freedom fight, or the civil rights movement - was a black-led, interracial mass movement which effectively ended legal segregation by the mid-60s.

Lectures will outline the movement's three over-lapping and occasionally complimentary phases - lobbying, litigation and protest.

In the first phase, from 1910 to the middle '30s, it developed a campaign of propaganda, education and lobbying to shape public opinion and create a climate favorable to civil rights.

In phase 2, from the '30s to the '50s, it sought and won important test cases in housing segregation and the right to vote, and attacking separate and unequal schools.

The last phase, lasting a decade from '54 through '65, was a decade of protests - boycotts, sit-ins, and mass demonstrations - as well as grass-roots organizing campaigns that laid the groundwork for minority electoral victories in the late '60s and '70s.

Through the leadership of various national and local organizations, and through anti-segregation campaigns directed by indigenous and extra-communal leadership figures who built on extensive pre-existing networks of church, fraternal, social and labor organizations, drawing strength and followers from a protest community rooted in black America and created in response to white supremacy, the movement succeeded in eliminating legal segregation. The movement's well-known and lesser-known proponents and their strategies will be examined.

Required Discussion Section

HIUS 4591: Virtual Vinegar Hill II: Visualizing an African American Memoryscape (3)

Instructor: Scot French and Bill Ferster

3:30-6:00PM W, New Cabell Hall 242

In the 1960s, Charlottesville's Vinegar Hill neighborhood -- a center of African American business activity and community life for nearly a century

-- was declared "blighted" by local authorities and demolished under the federally funded Urban Renewal program. Project boosters hailed the redevelopment project, coupled with the opening of a modern public housing complex several blocks away, as a much-needed upgrade to the downtown area.

Yet, for Charlottesville's African American citizens, the project produced a profound sense of rupture and loss that lingers to this day. Vinegar Hill, as a "site of memory," has come to symbolize the demise of African American-owned businesses; the disintegration of African American community life; and the erasure of African American history from Charlottesville's commemorative landscape.

Building on the collaborative efforts of University students, faculty, and participating community groups, this class will explore the possibilities for visualizing the Vinegar Hill "memoryscape" through a state-of-the-art interactive website. Students will work with photographs, fire insurance maps, newspapers, city directories, census returns, oral histories, and a variety of public records related to the urban renewal/public housing project. What might the thoughtful application of digital technologies to these historical texts and statistical data reveal? What questions might we ask that would shed new light on this neighborhood and the social forces that led to its demise? Prior experience with humanities computing is not required.

Prospective readings include selected chapters from: James Saunders and Renae Shackelford, Urban Renewal and the End of Black Culture in Charlottesville, Virginia: An Oral History of Vinegar Hill; W. Fitzhugh Brundage, The Southern Past: A Clash of Race and Memory; David J. Staley, Computers, Visualization, and History: How New Technology Will Transform Our Understanding of the Past, and Benjamin J. Fry, Computational Information Design.

Grading will be based on weekly reading responses/class participation (30 percent); a 7-10-page research report and/or documentary video script based on primary and secondary sources (35 percent); and the development and presentation of a web-based "visualization" in consultation with fellow students and the instructors (35 percent).

Media Studies

MDST 3559 - Race & the Media (1- 4)

Instructor: Staff

1:00-1:50PM M/W/F, Clark Hall 102

Department of Music

MUEN 3690 - African Drumming and Dance Ensemble (2)

Instructor: Michelle Kisliuk

5:15-7:15PM Tu/Th, Old Cabell Hall 107

A practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from West Africa (Ghana, Togo) and Central Africa (BaAka pygmies), with the intention of performing during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member. The course is repeatable for credit, providing experienced students the opportunity to develop within an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble. Admission is by informal audition during the first class meeting.

Department of Politics

PLAP 3500 - Special Topics in American Politics: Race and Gender in US Politics (3)

Instructor: Lynn Sanders

1:00-1:50PM M/W, Gilmer Hall 190

PLAP 4810 - Class, Race, and the Environment (3)

Instructor: Vivian Thompson

1:00-3:30PM Tu, Brown Reading Room

PLCP 2120 - Politics of Developing Areas(3)

Instructor: Robert Fatton/ David Waldner

9:00-9:50AM M/W, Wilson Hall 402

Surveys patterns of government and politics in non-Western political systems. Topics include political elites, sources of political power, national integration, economic development, and foreign penetration.

PLCP 5840 - Gender Politics in Africa (3)

Instructor: Denise Walsh

2:00-3:15PM Tu/Th, Minor Hall 130

This course begins with the highly contested concepts of gender and feminism in Africa. We then turn to war and militarism, the basis of modern, gendered African nations and states. With the rise of African women’s movements, democratization and the spread of a human rights culture, African women won a greater role in politics, the third theme of the course. Their success increased hopes that the state would attack sexism. Those hopes have yet to be fulfilled as our investigation of some of the region’s most pressing problems, such as HIV/AIDS and limited economic development indicate.

Cross-listed as SWAG 5840

PLPT 3200 - African American Political Thought (3)

Instructor: Katherine (Lawrie) Balfour

11:00-12:15 Tu/Th, New Cabell Hall 424

This course examines both the critical and the constructive dimensions of African American political thought. Through our readings and discussions, we will assess the claims that black Americans have made upon the polity, how they have defined themselves, and how they have sought to redefine the basic terms of American public life. Among the themes that we will explore are the relationship between slavery and democracy, the role of historical memory in political life, the political significance of culture, the connections between “race” and “nation,” and the tensions between claims for black autonomy and claims for integration, as well as the meaning of such core political concepts as citizenship, freedom, equality, progress, and justice. As we focus our attention on these issues, we will be mindful of the complex ways in which the concept of race has been constructed and deployed and its interrelationship with other elements of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and religion.

Department of Psychology

PSYC 4870 - The Minority Family: A Psychological Inquiry

Instructor: Melvin Wilson

9:00-11:30AM Tu, Gilmer Hall B001

Examines the current state of research on minority families, focusing on the black family. Emphasizes comparing "deficit" and "strength" research pardigms.

Prerequisite: PSYC 306 and at least on course from each of the following groups: PSYC 210, 215, or 230, and PSYC 240, 250 or 260, and students in the African-American and African studies or studies in women and gender programs.

Enrollment Restrictions: 4th-year Psychology majors/minor

Department of Religious Studies

RELA 2750 - Introduction to African Religions(3)

Instructor: Cynthia Hoehler-Fatton

1:00-1:50PM M/W, Gilmer Hall 141

An introductory survey of African religions. The course concentrates on African indigenous religions, but Islam and Christianity are also discussed. Topics include African mythologies and cosmologies, as well as rituals, artistic traditions and spiritualities. We consider the colonial impact on African religious cultures and the dynamics of ongoing religious change in the sub-Sahara.

Required Discussion Section

RELA 3351 - African Diaspora Religions (3)

Instructor: Jalane Schmidt

2:00-3:15PM Tu/Th, New Cabell Hall B020

The seminar will examine the changes in ethnographic accounts of African diaspora religions, with particular attention given to how different research paradigms illuminate these Caribbean and Latin American religions and the questions of religion, race, nation, and modernity. Practitioners of these religions are conventionally regarded as atavistically maintaining a “traditional” world-view. But this class will evaluate how devotees of African diaspora religions are continually innovating their religious practices as they navigate modernity. While learning about the specificities of African diaspora religions, students will also study theoretical changes in the field of cultural anthropology vis-à-vis the investigation of African-descended communities, material religion, ritual performance, and the effects of national politics and transnational migration patterns upon religious practice.

Written requirements include a 20-page seminar paper which meets the Second Writing Requirement.

RELG 2700 - Festivals of the Americas (3)

Instructor: Jalane Schmidt

9:30-10:45AM Tu/Th, McLeod Hall 1004

By reading case studies of various religious festivals in locations throughout the Caribbean and South, Central and North America, as well as theoretical literature drawn from social anthropology and religious studies, students will become familiar with significant features of contemporary religious life in the Americas, as well as with scholarly accounts of religious and cultural change. Students will become more critical readers of ethnographic and historical sources, as well as theories from the Study of Religion (Jonathan Z. Smith, Ronald Grimes, Lawrence Sullivan), and will increase their ability to theorize about ritual, festivity, sacred time, ritual space and ethnicity

Required DiscussionSection

Cross-listed as AAS 2700

RELG 3200 - Martin, Malcolm, and America (3)

Instructor: Mark Hadley

12:00-12:50PM M/W/F, New Cabell Hall 215

An intensive examination of African-American social criticism centered upon, but not limited to, the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. We will come to grips with the American legacy of racial hatred and oppression systematized in the institutions of antebellum chattel slavery and post-bellum racial segregation and analyze the array of critical responses to, and social struggles against, this legacy. We will pay particular attention to the religious dimensions of these various types of social criticism

Cross-listed as AAS 3200

RELG 3351 - African Diaspora Religions

Instructor: Jalane Schmidt

The seminar will examine the changes in ethnographic accounts of African diaspora religions, with particular attention given to how different research paradigms illuminate these Caribbean and Latin American religions and the questions of religion, race, nation, and modernity. Practitioners of these religions are conventionally regarded as atavistically maintaining a “traditional” world-view. But this class will evaluate how devotees of African diaspora religions are continually innovating their religious practices as they navigate modernity. While learning about the specificities of African diaspora religions, students will also study theoretical changes in the field of cultural anthropology vis-à-vis the investigation of African-descended communities, material religion, ritual performance, and the effects of national politics and transnational migration patterns upon religious practice.

Written requirements include a 20-page seminar paper which meets the 2^nd Writing Requirement.

Department of Sociology

SOC 3410 - Race and Ethnic Relations (3)

Instructor: Milton Vickerman

2:00-3:15 M/W, New Cabell Hall 316

Introduces the study of race and ethnic relations, including the social and economic conditions promoting prejudice, racism, discrimination, and segregation. Examines contemporary American conditions, and historical and international materials.

SOC 4420 - Sociology of Inequality (3)

Instructor: Milton Vickerman

4:00-5:15 M/W, New Cabell Hall 123

A survey of basic theories and methods used to analyze structures of social inequality. Includes comparative analysis of the inequalities of power and privilege, both their causes and their consequences for social conflict and social change.

Prerequisite: Six credits of sociology or permission of instructor

Studies in Women and Gender

SWAG 5840 - Gender Politics in Africa (3)

Instructor: Denise Walsh

2:00-3:15PM Tu/Th, Minor Hall 130

This course begins with the highly contested concepts of gender and feminism in Africa. We then turn to war and militarism, the basis of modern, gendered African nations and states. With the rise of African women’s movements, democratization and the spread of a human rights culture, African women won a greater role in politics, the third theme of the course. Their success increased hopes that the state would attack sexism. Those hopes have yet to be fulfilled as our investigation of some of the region’s most pressing problems, such as HIV/AIDS and limited economic development indicate.

Cross-listed as PLCP 5840

Spring 2009

African-American and African Studies Program

AAS 102 - Crosscurrents in the African Diaspora (4)

Instructor: Claudrena Harold

1230-1345 TR, WIL 301

This introductory course builds upon the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean surveyed in AAS 101. Drawing on disciplines such as Anthropology, History, Religious Studies, Political Science and Sociology, the course focuses on the period from the late 19th century to the present and is comparative in perspective. It examines the links and disjunctions between communities of African descent in the United States and in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. The course begins with an overview of AAS, its history, assumptions, boundaries, and topics of inquiry, and then proceeds to focus on a number of inter-related themes: patterns of cultural experience; community formation; comparative racial classification; language and society; family and kinship; religion; social and political movements; arts and aesthetics; and archaeology of the African Diaspora.

AAS 215 - Culture and World Politics (3)

Instructor: Maurice Apprey

1530-1800 T, CAB B026

AAS 220 - African Women Writers (3)

Instructor: Z'etoile Imma

1100-1215 TR, CAB 224

AAS 308 - Fugitive Slaves in a Global Perspective (3)

Instructor: Lydia Wilson

1400-1515 TR, CAB B026

This course surveys anthropological, historical, and archaeological approaches to the study of fugitive slaves, also known as maroons. The course considers the importance of maroon studies in highlighting Africans' resistance to enslavement in the Americas and explores themes taken up in more recent research, such as community formation. Students will examine the public interpretation of maroon history, review research on fugitive slaves in a variety of world regions, and consider the continued challenges some descendant communities have faced.

AAS 351 - The Politics of Development in Africa (3)

Instructor: Kristin Phillips

1400-1515 MW, WIL 215

Since the mid-twentieth century "development" has served as the dominant paradigm (as well as the justification) for international intervention into the political, economic, and social affairs of African communities and states. In this course we will draw on anthropological theories, ethnographies of development, and critiques of development to explore the history and politics of these interventions. We will begin by examining the kinds of interventions that foreshadowed development - trade, colonialism, missionization. We will then trace the life history of the development project in post-colonial Africa through its diverse agents and various incarnations: from its inception, through structural adjustment programs, democratization and the post-development critique, to the emergence of neoliberalism as development's governing philosophy. Throughout, we will draw on ethnographies of development in Africa to gain a deeper understanding of how people living in Africa experience their economic, political, and social positions in today's world and how international interventions have shaped these experiences, for better and for worse.

AAS 366 - African American History Since 1865 (3)

Instructor: Claudrena Harold

1530-1620 TR, WIL 301

This course surveys the major political, economic, and cultural developments in black America from the end of the Civil War to the present. Specifically focusing on the complex character of black life in the United States, students will examine African Americans’ protracted struggle to build strong families and communities, create vibrant and socially meaningful artistic productions, and confront what philosopher Cornel West refers to as the “pervasive evil of unjustified suffering and unnecessary social misery in our world.” Exploring the political and philosophical concerns pursued by activists and intellectuals like W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, Ralph Ellison, Angela Davis, Amiri Barka, Toni Cade Bambara, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, this class critically engages black Americans’ complex views on what it means to be American, modern, and human. Organizations and movements that will be discussed include but are not limited to the Garvey Movement, SNCC, the Black Panther Party, the Nation of Islam, and the League of Revolutionary Black Workers. Cultural expressions and movements that will be explored include but are not limited to the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, 1960s jazz and soul, funk, and hip-hop.

Cross-listed as HIUS 366

AAS 382 - Black Protest Narrative (3)

Instructor: Marlon Ross

1400-1515 TR, BRN 330

This course explores the relation between modern racial protest and African American narrative art (fiction, autobiography, film, narrative poetry) from the mid-1930s to the early 1970s, focusing on the Great Depression, World War II, the Civil Rights movement, and the emergence of Black Power. As well as examining the social, political, and economic contexts of protest narratives, we’ll probe their aesthetic, formal, and ideological structures, and assess how protest writers represent controversial topics of the time, such as lynching, segregation, sharecropping, disenfranchisement, anti-Semitism, unemployment, migration, urbanization, religion, sexuality, war and military service, strikebreaking, cross-racial coalitions, and the role of the individual in social change. We start with the most famous protest narrative, Richard Wright’s Native Son, then study other narratives, many of which challenge Wright’s forms and ideas. Other writers include Angelo Herndon, William Attaway, Ann Petry, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Martin Luther King, Jr., Alice Walker, and Bobby Seale, as well as pertinent readings in history, literary criticism, journalism, and social science. Requirements include heavy reading schedule. midterm, final exam, and reading journal.

Cross-listed as ENAM 382

AAS 401 - Independent Study (1-3)

Allows students to work on an individual research project. Students must propose a topic to an appropriate faculty member, submit a written proposal for approval, prepare an extensive annotated bibliography on relevant readings comparable to the reading list of a regular upper-level course, and complete a research paper of at least 20 pages.

AAS 406A - From Gold Coast to Reparations: A Social History of American Slavery(3)

Instructor: Deirdre Cooper Owens

1500-1830 T, CAB 130

This course will survey African slavery in the Americas broadly (16th century – 19th century) and the U.S. South during both the colonial and antebellum eras. In addition to centralizing the market costs of slavery and exploring the “world the slaves made,” we will also examine the little-known world of slavery among native peoples. Lastly, we will analyze both the impact and legacy of slavery on contemporary American society.

AAS 406B - Ethnicity and Religion in Nigeria and South Africa (3)

Instructor: John Willis

1530-1800 R, CAB 334

This course explores the diversity of gendered and ethnic identities in sub-Saharan African societies. Drawing from various moments in South Africa’s and Nigeria’s history, it examines how these identities have been historically articulated in words and action. It considers the cultural symbols and practices from which individuals and groups have drawn to define gender and ethnic norms. In many respects, these countries have very different histories reflecting alternative visions of Africa. South Africa has long been known as a multi-racial society, a magnet of European settlement, an apartheid state, and the most westernized and mineral-rich African nation. Conversely, Nigeria has developed a reputation as a mono-racial, multi-ethnic and multi-religious society, a repellant to European settlement, a military state fraught with ethnic conflicts, and as Africa’s most corrupt and human-resource rich nation. Students will examine some of the historical factors that have contributed to the development of these nations and the images of them that circulate both on the continent and in Europe and the United States. The course asks several questions: Does the use of gender and ethnicity as categories of analysis allow students to see more points of similarity than difference between the two nations? How have notions of gender become associated with ethnic and national identities? What have been some of the social, political, and economic implications of an individual’s location as a gendered or ethnic being?

AAS 451 - Directed Reading and Research for DMP (3)

Independent Study

Similar in format to AAS 401, but meant to be equivalent to twice as much work (6 credits), and taken over a full year. Students in the DMP enroll under these numbers for thesis writing.

AAS 452 - Thesis for DMP (3)

Meeting time to be determined by instructor and student

American Studies Program

AMST 201 - Arts and Cultures of the Slave South (3)

Instructor: Maurie McInnis and Louis Nelson

1530-1645 MW, CLK 107

"Arts and Cultures of the Slave South” is an undergraduate, interdisciplinary course that covers the American South to the Civil War. While the course centers on the visual arts—architecture, material culture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture—it is not designed as a regional history of art, but an exploration of the interrelations between history, material and visual cultures, foodways, music and literature in the formation of Southern identities. The course will cover subjects ranging from African American spirituals to creolization and ethnicities in Louisiana, from the plantation architectures of both big house and outbuildings to the narratives of former slaves. In the process, students will be introduced to the interpretive methods central to a wide range of disciplines, from archaeology and anthropology, to art and architectural history, to material culture, literature, and musicology. In addition to two weekly lectures by co-faculty Maurie McInnis and Louis Nelson, students will also attend weekly discussion sections and special events including guest lectures, field trips, movie nights, and demonstrations and samplings of traditional southern foods.

Cross-listed as ARTH 263 and CCFA 202

AMST 201 - Rural Poverty in Our Time (3)

Instructor: Grace Hale

1530-1710 T, MIN 125

This course will explore the history of non-urban poverty in the American South from the 1930s to the present. Weaving together the social histories of poor people, the political history of poverty policies, and the cultural history of representations of poverty, the course follows historical cycles of attention and neglect: rural poverty during the Great Depression, rural poverty from the war on poverty to the Reagan Revolution, and rural poverty in the age of Katrina, the present. In each section, we will examine the relationship between representations (imagining poverty), policies (alleviating poverty), and results (the effects of those representations and policies in the economic, political, and psychological status of poor people).

Cross-listed as HIUS 360

AMST 401A-1 - American Film: Los Angeles in Hollywood (3)

Instructor: Eric Lott

1700-1930 R, BRN 310

Not exactly a conventional film course, this one will use Hollywood cinema as the centerpiece of an inquiry into the cultural history and imaginary geography of Los Angeles. In addition to cultural historians and geographers such as Mike Davis, Sue Ruddick, and Eric Avila, we’ll read theorists of the so-called culture industry (e.g., Theodor Adorno), social commentators and gossips on L.A. and Hollywood (e.g., Carey McWilliams, Chester Himes, John Gregory Dunne, Kenneth Anger), and such novels as Nathanael West’s Day of the Locust (1939), Budd Schulberg’s What Makes Sammy Run? (1941), and Michael Tolkin’s The Player (1988). Plus, of course, the films, all of them about Los Angeles or Hollywood itself: e.g., King Vidor’s Show People (1928), Preston Sturges’ Sullivan’s Travels (1941), Billy Wilder’s Double Indemnity (1944), Howard Hawks’ The Big Sleep (1946), Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard (1950), Stanley Donnen/Gene Kelly’s Singin in the Rain (1952), Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without a Cause (1955), Robert Aldrich’s Kiss Me Deadly (1955), Roger Corman’s Little Shop of Horrors (1960), Mark Robson’s Valley of the Dolls (1968), Melvin Van Peebles’ Sweet Sweetback’s Baadass Song (1971), Roman Polanski’s Chinatown (1974), Hal Ashby’s Shampoo (1975), Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep (1977), Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1982), Amy Heckerling’s Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), James Cameron’s The Terminator (1984), William Friedkin’s To Live and Die in L.A. (1985), Luis Valdez’s La Bamba (1987), John Singleton’s Boyz n the Hood (1991), Joel Schumacher’s Falling Down (1993), Robert Altman’s Short Cuts (1993), Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction (1994), Tim Burton’s Ed Wood (1994), Carl Franklin’s Devil in a Blue Dress (1995), F. Gary Gray’s Set It Off (1997), Curtis Hanson’s L.A. Confidential (1997), Joel and Ethan Coen’s The Big Lebowski (1998), Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia (1999), David Lynch’s Mulholland Dr. (2001), Lisa Cholodenko’s Laurel Canyon (2002), Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator (2004).

Cross-listed as ENLT 255-2

Department of Anthropology

ANTH 291A - People, Culture and Environments of Africa (3)

Instructor: Matthew Powlowicz

1000-1050 MWF, CAB 123

Humans and the natural environment engage in a complex interaction. Humans transform their surroundings even as those surroundings shape the societies and cultural institutions they create. This course pursues both the question of how this interaction has proceeded in different places and among different peoples in Africa, and the cultural significances given to the environment so that we might better understand why it proceeded in that way. Drawing on evidence from ethnography, archaeology, ethnohistory and folklore we will examine how nature becomes entangled with political power and social ranking, with memory and group identity, and the consequences for the environment, and for the people who live there, which result.

ANTH 291B - Religion and Relationships: Caribbean Perspectives (3)

Instructor: Todne Thomas

0900-0950 MWF, CAB 324

This course analyzes the constitution and reproduction of Caribbean religious communities within the social contexts of enslavement, emancipation, postcolonialism, and transnationalism. Assigned readings survey ethnographies of Christianity, Hinduism, and Afro-Caribbean traditions like Rastafarianism, Vodun, and Candomble'. Course discussions and themes consider the contours of Caribbean religious groups as well as means by which ritual, religious ideologies, and kinship discourses enmesh practitioners in religious networks.

ANTH 554A - Africa and Social Theory (3)

Instructor: Sasha Newell

1530-1800 W, CAB B028

The encounter between Europe and Africa has produced some of the most important social theory and some of the most problematic misrepresentations. This course tracks the social imaginary of Africa in relationship to the development of theoretical frameworks through which Africa is represented. If the concept of the fetish was born out of cross-cultural misunderstandings between Europe and Africa, to what extent is Africa itself a fetish through which the European self is produced? Exploring the anthropology of exchange, bodies and persons, kinship, witchcraft, and colonialism in Africa, we investigate the implications for collective representations of Africa. At the same time we consider Africa's symbolic role within theories of modernity, race, economy, and religion through which Europe sets itself apart in the global hierarchy. This class thus explores the ambiguous zone between the 'real', the imaginary, and the theory of Africa, and the way each has fed into the construction of the other.

This class will fulfill the second writing requirement.

SWAH 102 - Introduction to Swahili II (3)

Instructor: Michael Wairungu

0900-0950 MWF, CAB 224

1100-1150 MWF, MIN 130

This is the second part of a two-semester beginning Swahili course. It will focus on developing the already acquired Swahili listening, speaking, reading and writing skills so as to understand basic Swahili, and actively participate in day-to-day Swahili cultural activities. Enrollment in this course is subject to Instructor's Permission as the student is required to have completed SWAH 101 at UVa. Upon completion of this course, students will be expected to demonstrate evidence of the acquisition of: a) basic skills in performing day-to-day interactions such as greetings, interpersonal conversations, and comprehension in Swahili; b) use of simple but fairly communicative grammatical constructions; c) appreciation of basic cultural practices of the Swahili-speaking people. Class meetings shall be supplemented by technology sessions where deemed appropriate.

Department of Art History

ARTH 263 - Arts and Cultures of the Slave South (4)

Instructor: Maurie McInnis and Louis Nelson

1530-1645 MW, CLK 107

"Arts and Cultures of the Slave South” is an undergraduate, interdisciplinary course that covers the American South to the Civil War. While the course centers on the visual arts—architecture, material culture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture—it is not designed as a regional history of art, but an exploration of the interrelations between history, material and visual cultures, foodways, music and literature in the formation of Southern identities. The course will cover subjects ranging from African American spirituals to creolization and ethnicities in Louisiana, from the plantation architectures of both big house and outbuildings to the narratives of former slaves. In the process, students will be introduced to the interpretive methods central to a wide range of disciplines, from archaeology and anthropology, to art and architectural history, to material culture, literature, and musicology. In addition to two weekly lectures by co-faculty Maurie McInnis and Louis Nelson, students will also attend weekly discussion sections and special events including guest lectures, field trips, movie nights, and demonstrations and samplings of traditional southern foods.

Cross-Listed as AMST 201 and CCFA 202

Department of Drama

DRAM 307 - African American Theatre (3)

Instructor: Theresa Davis

1400-1515 TR, DRM 217

Presents a comprehensive study of “Black Theatre” as the African-American contribution to the theatre. Explores the historical, cultural, and socio-political underpinnings of this this theatre as an artistic form in American and world culture. Students gain a broader understanding of the relationship and contributions of this theatre to theatre arts, business, education, lore, and humanity. A practical theatrical experience is a part of the course offering.

Department of English

CPLT 342 - Contemporary Drama (3)

Instructor: Lotta Löfgren

1530-1645 TR, BRN 334

This is the second half of a two-semester course on modern and contemporary American and European drama (with a few forays into other regions), covering post-Absurdism to the present. The first half is not a prerequisite. We will examine postwar quests for dramatic and theatrical structures relevant to a socially and morally chaotic world. From a study of reactions to the Theatre of the Absurd, we move to an investigation of contemporary drama, celebrating the success of women and minority playwrights in our own period. These playwrights, earlier deprived of a voice, have transformed theater of the past fifty years. We will read plays by Ntozake Shange, Tom Stoppard, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Tony Kushner, Sam Shepard, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, and others.

Course requirements: two short papers, a long paper or a project (one option is to write your own play), a final exam.

Cross-listed as ENGN 342

ENAM 314 - African American Literature (3)

Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

0930-1045 TR, CAB 118

A continuation of ENAM 313, African American Literature I, this course concentrates on twentieth and twenty-first century African American novels, short stories, prose essays, and poetry. This lecture and discussion based class will address literature from pivotal cultural and political moments in African American life, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement. Writers include, but are not limited to, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and several contemporary authors. Mandatory assignments include response paragraphs, papers, quizzes, midterm and final exams.

ENAM 382 - Black Protest Narrative (3)

Instructor: Marlon Ross

1400-1515 TR, BRN 330

This course explores the relation between modern racial protest and African American narrative art (fiction, autobiography, film, narrative poetry) from the mid-1930s to the early 1970s, focusing on the Great Depression, World War II, the Civil Rights movement, and the emergence of Black Power. As well as examining the social, political, and economic contexts of protest narratives, we’ll probe their aesthetic, formal, and ideological structures, and assess how protest writers represent controversial topics of the time, such as lynching, segregation, sharecropping, disenfranchisement, anti-Semitism, unemployment, migration, urbanization, religion, sexuality, war and military service, strikebreaking, cross-racial coalitions, and the role of the individual in social change. We start with the most famous protest narrative, Richard Wright’s Native Son, then study other narratives, many of which challenge Wright’s forms and ideas. Other writers include Angelo Herndon, William Attaway, Ann Petry, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Martin Luther King, Jr., Alice Walker, and Bobby Seale, as well as pertinent readings in history, literary criticism, journalism, and social science. Requirements include heavy reading schedule. midterm, final exam, and reading journal.

ENAM 482C -African-American Speculative Fiction (3)

Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

1100-1215 TR, CAB 335

This class focuses on a genre of African American literature that is best described as "speculative." While all literature can be said to "speculate" about different topics, themes or events, the literary offerings in this class will venture into imagined worlds of horror, science fiction, fantasy as crafted by African American authors. Writers include Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, Tananarive Due and others. We will use these primary texts and other sources from film and television to question the racial markings and motives of "mainstream" speculative literatures and to consider the implications of the genre for African American literature and culture.

ENGN 342 - Contemporary Drama (3)

Instructor: Lotta Löfgren

1530-1645 TR, MRY 113

This is the second half of a two-semester course on modern and contemporary American and European drama (with a few forays into other regions), covering post-Absurdism to the present. The first half is not a prerequisite. We will examine postwar quests for dramatic and theatrical structures relevant to a socially and morally chaotic world. From a study of reactions to the Theatre of the Absurd, we move to an investigation of contemporary drama, celebrating the success of women and minority playwrights in our own period. These playwrights, earlier deprived of a voice, have transformed theater of the past fifty years. We will read plays by Ntozake Shange, Tom Stoppard, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Tony Kushner, Sam Shepard, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, and others.

Course requirements: two short papers, a long paper or a project (one option is to write your own play), a final exam.

cross-listed as CLPT 342

ENGN 482B - Ethnic American Drama (3)

Instructor: Lotta Löfgren

1230-1345 TR, BRN 330

This seminar celebrates the richness, diversity, passion, and sophistication of contemporary ethnic American drama. We will read plays by African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and Native American dramatists. We will examine their shared concerns and their cultural particularities, and explore how all groups negotiate traditional dramatic forms and even fundamental definitions of theater to express their own visions. Our work with these plays will challenge old methods of interpretation and our own cultural assumptions. We will try to understand how these plays are and are not uniquely American by examining the plays themselves and reading a selection of theoretical works. We will explore some of the political challenges to and ramifications of ethnic American drama. We will read plays by David Henry Hwang, Ntozake Shange, Thomson Highway, Maria Irene Fornes, Suzan-Lori Parks, Wakako Yamauchi, Cherrie Moraga, William Yellow Robe, and others.

Cross-listed as ENMC 482B

ENLT 247 - Black Writers and Black Music(3)

Instructor: Eric Nunn

1530-1645 MW, BRN 312

This course traces the interrelations of twentieth-century African American literary and musical histories from W. E. B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk through the Negro Renaissance of the 1920s and the Black Arts movement of the 1960s to the present day.

ENLT 247- Black Writers and the Media (3)

Instructor: Benjamin Fagan

1700-1850 TR, BRN 312

Restricted to 1st and 2nd year students.

In this course students will examine a key trope that permeates African American literature: media. We will approach this term in two senses. On the one hand, we will look at how texts appear in diverse mediums, be they newspapers, anthologies, audio recordings, or television coverage. On the other hand, students will read key works that place the problem of media representation at the center of their projects. Students will spend a significant amount of time with each selected text, allowing them to develop critical close reading skills. Moreover, by examining one work in multiple mediums they will be able to investigate how form and presentation inflect a text's meaning. We will read texts ranging from 18th century poetry to 21st century oratory. We will read canonical authors such as Phyllis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, and Ralph Ellison, and also consider the works of lesser-known writers such as Martin Delany and Francis Ellen Watkins.

ENLT 255-2 - American Film: Los Angeles in Hollywood (3)

Instructor: Eric Lott

1700-1930 R, BRN 310

Not exactly a conventional film course, this one will use Hollywood cinema as the centerpiece of an inquiry into the cultural history and imaginary geography of Los Angeles. In addition to cultural historians and geographers such as Mike Davis, Sue Ruddick, and Eric Avila, we’ll read theorists of the so-called culture industry (e.g., Theodor Adorno), social commentators and gossips on L.A. and Hollywood (e.g., Carey McWilliams, Chester Himes, John Gregory Dunne, Kenneth Anger), and such novels as Nathanael West’s Day of the Locust (1939), Budd Schulberg’s What Makes Sammy Run? (1941), and Michael Tolkin’s The Player (1988). Plus, of course, the films, all of them about Los Angeles or Hollywood itself: e.g., King Vidor’s Show People (1928), Preston Sturges’ Sullivan’s Travels (1941), Billy Wilder’s Double Indemnity (1944), Howard Hawks’ The Big Sleep (1946), Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard (1950), Stanley Donnen/Gene Kelly’s Singin in the Rain (1952), Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without a Cause (1955), Robert Aldrich’s Kiss Me Deadly (1955), Roger Corman’s Little Shop of Horrors (1960), Mark Robson’s Valley of the Dolls (1968), Melvin Van Peebles’ Sweet Sweetback’s Baadass Song (1971), Roman Polanski’s Chinatown (1974), Hal Ashby’s Shampoo (1975), Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep (1977), Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1982), Amy Heckerling’s Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), James Cameron’s The Terminator (1984), William Friedkin’s To Live and Die in L.A. (1985), Luis Valdez’s La Bamba (1987), John Singleton’s Boyz n the Hood (1991), Joel Schumacher’s Falling Down (1993), Robert Altman’s Short Cuts (1993), Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction (1994), Tim Burton’s Ed Wood (1994), Carl Franklin’s Devil in a Blue Dress (1995), F. Gary Gray’s Set It Off (1997), Curtis Hanson’s L.A. Confidential (1997), Joel and Ethan Coen’s The Big Lebowski (1998), Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia (1999), David Lynch’s Mulholland Dr. (2001), Lisa Cholodenko’s Laurel Canyon (2002), Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator (2004).

Cross-listed as AMST 401-A1

Department of French Language & Literature

FREN 346 - African Literatures and Cultures (3)

Instructor: Kandioura Drame

1000-1050 MWF, CAB 236

This course will explore aspects of African literatures and cultures. It will focus on selected issues of special resonance in contemporary African life. Oral literature and its continuing impact on all other art forms. Key issues in French colonial policy and its legacy in Africa: language, politics, education. The course will examine the image of the postcolonial state and society as found in contemporary arts, paintings, sculpture, music, and cinema. Selections from painters like Cheri Samba (Democratic Republic of Congo), Werewere Liking (Cameroun) and sculptors like Ousmane Sow, including such popular icons as Mamy Wata and forms such as Souwere glass painting; from musicians like Youssou Ndour (Senegal), Cheb Khaled (Algeria), Seigneur Rochereau, Tshala Muana (DRC), Salif Keita (Mali), and Cesaria Evora (Cape Verde); from Mande, Peul, and Kabyle oral literatures in French translation; from filmmakers D.D. Mambety, Moussa Sene Absa, and Ngangura Mweze. Visit to National Museum of African Arts depending on availability of funding. The final grade will be based on contributions to discussions, a mid-term exam, 2 papers, and a final exam.

Prerequisite: French 332

FREN 411 - Francophone Literature of Africa (3)

Instructor: Kandioura Drame

1200-1250 MWF, CAB 424

Introduction to the Francophone literature of Africa; survey, with special emphasis on post- World War II poets, novelists, and playwrights of Africa. The role of cultural and literary reviews (Légitime Défense, L'Etudiant noir, and Présence Africaine) in the historical and ideological development of this literature will be examined. Special reference will be made to Caribbean writers of the Negritude movement. Documentary videos on African history and cultures will be shown and important audio-tapes will also be played regularly. Supplementary texts will be assigned occasionally. Students will be expected to present response papers on a regular basis.

In addition to the required reading material, 2 essays (60%), regular class attendance, and contribution to discussions (10%), and a final exam (30%) constitute the course requirements. Papers are due on the dates indicated on the syllabus.

Department of History

HIAF 202 - Modern African History (4)

Instructor: John E. Mason

0930-1045 TR, CMN G010

This course explores the history of Africa from the decline of the Atlantic slave trade, in the early nineteenth century, to the present. Our goal is to examine the historical roots of the continent's contemporary condition, both good and bad. We look at the slave trade and its consequences, the European conquest of most of the African continent, African resistance to colonial rule, and the reestablishment of African independence.

We concentrate on three regions: West Africa, especially Nigeria; Central Africa, especially the Congo and Rwanda; and southern Africa, especially South Africa. We pay particular attention to the ways in which colonialism affected ordinary Africans and with the various strategies that Africans employed to resist, subvert, and accommodate European domination.

HIAF 202 is an introductory course and assumes no prior knowledge of African history. There will be two blue book exams, a mid-term and a final and periodic quizzes on the readings

HIAF 401A - History Seminar - Modern African Conflict, Decolonization to the Present (4)

Instructor: John P. Cann

1530-1800 M, RAN 212

This seminar investigates the conduct of selected wars following the British, French, and Belgian decolonizations in Africa. Students will begin by developing an appreciation of the small war theorists and African culture to provide a framework for the understanding and analysis of this genre of conflict in both its military dimension and its broader socio-cultural context. The seminar will then consider the case studies of Biafra (1967-1970), the Portuguese Colonial War (1961-1974) and its aftermath, including the South African Border War (1966-1989), the Rhodesian Front War (1962-1980), and RENAMO in Mozambique (1976-1992) before proceeding to a selection of subsequent and often continuing conflicts, such as, Senegal (1982-2004), Algeria (1954-1962 and 1992-present), Chad (1978-1987), Sudan (1955-1972 and 1983-2005), Uganda (1987-2005), Sierra Leone (1991-2002), and the US involvement in Somalia (1992-1994). It will examine both internal factors, such as, tribal animosities, water and property rights, child soldiers, and religious tension, and external ones, such as, the role of NGOs, military companies, peacekeepers, former colonial powers, and neighboring states, in each of the contests. Readings are drawn from published materials with no more than 250 pages per week. Grading is based on class participation (50%) and on a research paper (50%) of approximately 20 pages on a relatively modern African conflict of the student’s choice that analyzes its causes, its participants and their motivations, its conduct, and the outcome based on the themes developed in seminar.

HIAF 404 - Independent Study in African History (3)

(Topic to be determined by instructor and student)

In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes.

Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.

HILA 202 - Modern Latin America (3)

Instructor: Brian P. Owensby

0930-1045 TR, RFB G004B

This course will explore the historiesof Latin America from the wars of independence between 1808-1830 to the present day. Emphasis will be on understanding the relationship between large economic structures and the lives of historical actorsin political, social, and cultural terms and in global context. Wewill read primary and secondary sources. I will lecture once a weekand we will have a semi-socratic discussion of the readings once aweek. I will ask you to write two interpretive essays, one roughly atmid-term and the other at the end of the semester.

Enrollment will belimited to 60.

HILA 402A - History Colloquium - Mestijaze and Race Mixing in Latin American History (4)

Instructor: Brian P. Owensby

1300-1530 T, RFN 227A

This colloquium will delve into the history of how Indigneous People, Europeans, and Africans met in the crucible of conquest and created anovel social order from the biological and cultural mixing thatcharged by the crossed circuits of desire, misunderstanding, violence,and accident. We will discuss “mestizaje”—cultural and biological mixing—the role of intermediaries, race, and race relations, from the16th- to the 21st centuries. We will read a broad range of books. Students will write interpretive essays aimed at problematizing conventional “racial” thinking.

Enrollment will be limited to 12 motivated students.

HIUS 360 - Rural Poverty in Our Times (3)

Instructor: Grace Hale

1530-1710 T, MIN 125

This course will explore the history of non-urban poverty in the American South from the 1930s to the present. Weaving together the social histories of poor people, the political history of poverty policies, and the cultural history of representations of poverty, the course follows historical cycles of attention and neglect: rural poverty during the Great Depression, rural poverty from the war on poverty to the Reagan Revolution, and rural poverty in the age of Katrina, the present. In each section, we will examine the relationship between representations (imagining poverty), policies (alleviating poverty), and results (the effects of those representations and policies in the economic, political, and psychological status of poor people).

Cross-listed as AMST 201

HIUS 366 - African American History from the Civil War to the Present (3)

Instructor: Claudrena Harold

1530-1620 TR, WIL 301

Поправив очки в железной оправе, человек посмотрел вслед удаляющемуся автобусу. Дэвид Беккер исчез, но это ненадолго. Из всех севильских автобусов мистер Беккер выбрал пользующийся дурной славой 27-й маршрут. Автобус номер 27 следует к хорошо известной конечной остановке. ГЛАВА 46 Фил Чатрукьян швырнул трубку на рычаг.

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