Women And Patriarchy Essay

The patriarchy is a social system that values masculinity over femininity. This type of social system dictates that men are entitled to be in charge and dominate women. And it implies the nature state of gender relations is a dynamic of dominance and submission. According to patriarchal society, women are seen weak, submissive and an extension of men, and the highest accomplishment a woman can hope to attain is marriage (heterosexual of course!) and child birthing.
On the reverse end of the spectrum, men are expected to be physically and emotionally strong, dominating, and the breadwinner and protector of his family. Although the domination of women today might not be as bad as, say, a couple hundred years ago when women had no legal rights and were considered their husbands property. Gender is still something that is strictly enforces on people today. In patriarchal society’s, cisgender men are typically valued over cisgender women.
However the system forces people into strict boxes called ‘gender roles’, and gender roles hurt everybody. If someone who is assigned a certain gender at birth doesn’t fit into the social norms expected of that gender, they’re often ostracized by society. In the past hundred years or so we’ve seen a loosening of gender roles for women but not so much for men. Women can act or dress in a more masculine fashion with less repercussions that if a man were to act or dress in a feminine way. This stems from the valuing of masculine traits over feminine traits and the association of femininity with weakness. It’s more okay for a woman to ”act like a man”, or whatever that means, than it is for a man to ”act like a woman”. However, the patriarchy doesn’t just harm cis women and cis men. It also hurts trans identities and everyone who doesn’t identify with the gender binary. Being transgender is almost like the ultimate slap in the face to patriarchy and gender roles because you’re stepping outside of the gender you were assigned to birth and saying ” to hell with that”. A lot of trans phobia that we see is based in sexism and the fact that someone is refusing to stay in the gender box that society put them in.

Women In The Patriarchal Society Essay

ENG 437 Essay 1

October 9, 2014

Women in the Patriarchal Society

Living in a male-dominated society considered as a difficult issue for women. Women, in these kinds of societies, have to choose between either to adapt with the current situation or to stand up with their own believes. Men like to control women in everything, some women do not show any objection toward that like the women in Yussef Idriss's story "A House of Flesh", but others do not allow men to control them like the woman in Nawal El Saadawi's story "A Modern Love Letter". By analyzing these two stories, I will illustrate the situation of women, who live in the patriarchal society, and how these women deal with the current situation in this society under the famous concept, which is "gender".

Yussef Idriss's story "A House of Flesh" is talking about a blind man who is able to control and dominate the mother and her daughters without showing any objection from these females. This man, even he is blind, looks at these females as an object. Women in this story are able to adapt with the patriarchal society and allow the blind man to dominant their life. The blind man marries the mother, and now, he is able to do whatever he wants, just because he is a man. The sexual relationships must be only between the husband and his wife, but in this story, the sexual relationship goes beyond that. The blind man goes beyond his limits; he has a sexual relationship the daughters. The mother knows that there is a big mistake, but she does not care about anything, she does not show any objection toward that, and she does not even try to protect her daughters from this illegal relationship. The only and everything that they do is to keep silent. Let's think about whom should we blame in this case, the mother or the blind man? In fact, both of them, the mother and the blind man, are responsible to be blame. No one can say that the man can see, because he is blind, but everyone can say that the blind man has other senses, so he can feel, touch, and hear others. It means that he knows very clearly that he does something wrong. Also, women always think about the people's opinion toward them, but men do not care about anyone else and it appears clearly in the following example. The blind man comes and asks to marry the mother of these daughters without caring about what will people say about him, but, in contrast, women always think that people will talk about their when they do anything, even if they do a good thing. It is very clear in the mother's conversation with her daughters about marring the blind man, the daughters say: ("Mother, you marry him . . . marry him". She replied: "Me? What shame, what will people say?") (p.18). According to...

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